Skin Glow from Eating Healthy

Skin glow from fruits and vegetables ‘more attractive than a tan’

Glowing Skin from a healthy diet

Glowing Skin from a healthy diet

 

According to the research team, including Carmen E. Lefevre of Leeds University Business School and David I. Perrett of the University of St. Andrews, both in the UK, studies have shown that skin coloration plays an important role in facial attractiveness. There are two primary ways in which skin coloration can occur, the researchers say: melanization, or tanning, and ingestion of carotenoids – organic pigments found in an array of colored fruits and vegetables, such as carrots, apricots, oranges, mangoes and spinach. Research has suggested that the yellow skin coloration created by dietary carotenoids is perceived as a “healthy” glow, but the team notes that it is unclear how this type of coloration influences perceptions of facial attractiveness.

 

 

 

Find out more here: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/281734.php

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather

The Skin’s Flora

 

 

MICROBIOTA – THE SKIN’S “FLORA”

The Skin's Flora

The Skin’s Flora

Our skin is a balanced ecosystem. Since it was colonized by billions of bacteria, viruses, fungi and mites at the dawn of the evolution of hominids, many species of microorganisms have lived in symbiosis with our skin mantle cells. Science’s efforts to identify our colonizers have revealed how essential these microorganisms are for the health of our skin. The most natural way to healthy skin is to help maintain the balance between all these microorganisms. Although it may be difficult to credit, only 10% of the cells of the body’s skin, intestines and mucous membranes are human. Most of them are of microscopic organisms that belong to the microbiota, the set of all foreign microbes that live in our body, especially in the digestive organs and the skin. For example, each square centimetre of human skin contains approximately one million microorganisms from a hundred different species. Together these form the skin’s microbiota (traditionally called the skin’s “flora”).

Learn more info here: http://www.thehealthyskinblog.org/microbiota-the-skins-flora/

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather