Low Protein Diet During Pregnancy Predisposes Offspring to Diabetes

Eating a low protein diet during pregnancy may predispose offspring to diabetes

Pregnancy Diet Tips

Pregnancy Diet Tips

 

Millions of people throughout the world are affected by diabetes. In particular, the rise in the incidence of type 2 diabetes is associated with global increases in obesity and changes in diet. There is also a genetic component to the development of type 2 diabetes, and recent evidence suggests that the fetal environment can influence the onset of this disease. A new study in the Journal of Clinical Investigation suggests that a maternal diet low in protein predisposes offspring to type 2 diabetes. Ernesto Bernal-Mizrachi and colleagues at the University of Michigan fed female mice either a normal diet or one low in protein throughout their pregnancies. Offspring of mothers fed a low protein diet had decreased insulin levels and fewer β cells, the insulin producing cells of the pancreas.

Learn more here: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/281940.php

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Probiotics Consumption Helps Diminish Fat Accumulation

Consuming probiotics for a month helps diminish fat accumulation in the liver, according to a new study

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Spanish scientists have demonstrated through an experiment on obese rats that the consumption of probiotics during thirty days helps diminish the accumulation of fat in the liver. This new finding, published by the journal PLOS ONE, is a great step forward on the fight against the Non-Alcolohic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD), which is closely related to obesity and diabetes. Researchers from the ‘Nutrition Biochemistry: Theurapetic Applications’ group (CTS-461) and the José Mataix Institute for Nutrition and Food Technology at the University of Granada have demonstrated that the administration of three probiotic strains diminishes the accumulation of fat in the liver of obese rats.

Learn more info here: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/279854.php

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Stress and High-Fat Meals Can Slow Down Metabolism in Women

Weighty issue: Stress and high-fat meals combine to slow metabolism in women

Researchers questioned study participants about the previous day’s stressors before giving them a meal consisting of 930 calories and 60 grams of fat. The scientists then measured their metabolic rate — how long it took the women to burn calories and fat — and took measures of blood sugar, triglycerides, insulin and the stress hormone cortisol. On average, the women in the study who reported one or more stressors during the previous 24 hours burned 104 fewer calories than nonstressed women in the seven hours after eating the high-fat meal — a difference that could result in weight gain of almost 11 pounds in one year. The stressed women also had higher levels of insulin, which contributes to the storage of fat, and less fat oxidation — the conversion of large fat molecules into smaller molecules that can be used as fuel. Fat that is not burned is stored.

Find out more here: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/07/140714100128.htm

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