Attention Ladies!

Wearing a bra ‘does not cause cancer’

Wearing a Bra Does No Harm?

Wearing a Bra Does No Harm?

“There have been some concerns that one of the reasons why breast cancer may be more common in developed countries compared with developing countries is differences in bra-wearing patterns,” explains Lu Chen, MPH, a researcher in the Public Health Sciences Division at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and a doctoral student in the Department of Epidemiology at the University of Washington School of Public Health, both in Seattle. The National Center For Health Research say the rumor that bras cause breast cancer was fueled by a 1995 book by Sydney Ross Singer and Soma Grismaijer called Dressed To Kill. In it, the authors claim that women who wear underwire bras for 12 hours a day have a much higher risk of developing cancer than women who do not wear bras. They consider that, by restricting the lymph system, bras cause toxins to build up in the breasts that eventually result in cancer.

Read more info here: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/282077.php

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Skin Glow from Eating Healthy

Skin glow from fruits and vegetables ‘more attractive than a tan’

Glowing Skin from a healthy diet

Glowing Skin from a healthy diet

 

According to the research team, including Carmen E. Lefevre of Leeds University Business School and David I. Perrett of the University of St. Andrews, both in the UK, studies have shown that skin coloration plays an important role in facial attractiveness. There are two primary ways in which skin coloration can occur, the researchers say: melanization, or tanning, and ingestion of carotenoids – organic pigments found in an array of colored fruits and vegetables, such as carrots, apricots, oranges, mangoes and spinach. Research has suggested that the yellow skin coloration created by dietary carotenoids is perceived as a “healthy” glow, but the team notes that it is unclear how this type of coloration influences perceptions of facial attractiveness.

 

 

 

Find out more here: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/281734.php

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Skin Glow from Eating Healthy

Skin glow from fruits and vegetables ‘more attractive than a tan’

Glowing Skin from a healthy diet

Glowing Skin from a healthy diet

 

According to the research team, including Carmen E. Lefevre of Leeds University Business School and David I. Perrett of the University of St. Andrews, both in the UK, studies have shown that skin coloration plays an important role in facial attractiveness. There are two primary ways in which skin coloration can occur, the researchers say: melanization, or tanning, and ingestion of carotenoids – organic pigments found in an array of colored fruits and vegetables, such as carrots, apricots, oranges, mangoes and spinach. Research has suggested that the yellow skin coloration created by dietary carotenoids is perceived as a “healthy” glow, but the team notes that it is unclear how this type of coloration influences perceptions of facial attractiveness.

 

 

 

Find out more here: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/281734.php

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Low Protein Diet During Pregnancy Predisposes Offspring to Diabetes

Eating a low protein diet during pregnancy may predispose offspring to diabetes

Pregnancy Diet Tips

Pregnancy Diet Tips

 

Millions of people throughout the world are affected by diabetes. In particular, the rise in the incidence of type 2 diabetes is associated with global increases in obesity and changes in diet. There is also a genetic component to the development of type 2 diabetes, and recent evidence suggests that the fetal environment can influence the onset of this disease. A new study in the Journal of Clinical Investigation suggests that a maternal diet low in protein predisposes offspring to type 2 diabetes. Ernesto Bernal-Mizrachi and colleagues at the University of Michigan fed female mice either a normal diet or one low in protein throughout their pregnancies. Offspring of mothers fed a low protein diet had decreased insulin levels and fewer β cells, the insulin producing cells of the pancreas.

Learn more here: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/281940.php

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The Skin’s Flora

 

 

MICROBIOTA – THE SKIN’S “FLORA”

The Skin's Flora

The Skin’s Flora

Our skin is a balanced ecosystem. Since it was colonized by billions of bacteria, viruses, fungi and mites at the dawn of the evolution of hominids, many species of microorganisms have lived in symbiosis with our skin mantle cells. Science’s efforts to identify our colonizers have revealed how essential these microorganisms are for the health of our skin. The most natural way to healthy skin is to help maintain the balance between all these microorganisms. Although it may be difficult to credit, only 10% of the cells of the body’s skin, intestines and mucous membranes are human. Most of them are of microscopic organisms that belong to the microbiota, the set of all foreign microbes that live in our body, especially in the digestive organs and the skin. For example, each square centimetre of human skin contains approximately one million microorganisms from a hundred different species. Together these form the skin’s microbiota (traditionally called the skin’s “flora”).

Learn more info here: http://www.thehealthyskinblog.org/microbiota-the-skins-flora/

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The Skin’s Flora

 

 

MICROBIOTA – THE SKIN’S “FLORA”

The Skin's Flora

The Skin’s Flora

Our skin is a balanced ecosystem. Since it was colonized by billions of bacteria, viruses, fungi and mites at the dawn of the evolution of hominids, many species of microorganisms have lived in symbiosis with our skin mantle cells. Science’s efforts to identify our colonizers have revealed how essential these microorganisms are for the health of our skin. The most natural way to healthy skin is to help maintain the balance between all these microorganisms. Although it may be difficult to credit, only 10% of the cells of the body’s skin, intestines and mucous membranes are human. Most of them are of microscopic organisms that belong to the microbiota, the set of all foreign microbes that live in our body, especially in the digestive organs and the skin. For example, each square centimetre of human skin contains approximately one million microorganisms from a hundred different species. Together these form the skin’s microbiota (traditionally called the skin’s “flora”).

Learn more info here: http://www.thehealthyskinblog.org/microbiota-the-skins-flora/

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Premature Infants Fed Human Milk Fat Showed Improved Growth

Improved growth in premature infants fed human milk fat

For premature infants, adequate growth while in the neonatal intensive care unit is an indicator of better long-term health and developmental outcomes. Researchers at the USDA/ARS Children’s Nutrition Research Center at Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children’s Hospital have now successfully incorporated a cream supplement into premature infants’ diets that improved their growth outcomes in the NICU. The report appears in the Journal of Pediatrics. “For premature babies who weigh less than 1,000 grams (about 2 pounds, 2 ounces), one of the problems is that their lungs and other organs are still developing when they are born. If the infant gains weight and increases in length at a good rate while in the NICU, this helps improve their outcomes,” said Dr. Amy Hair, assistant professor of pediatrics at Baylor, neonatologist at Texas Children’s Hospital and first author of the study.

Learn more info here: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/281140.php

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NSAIDs may halve breast cancer recurrence in overweight women

NSAIDs may halve breast cancer recurrence in overweight women

The researchers examined data from 440 women with invasive, estrogen receptor alpha (ERα)-positive breast cancer who were treated at the University of Texas Health Science Center and the START Center for Cancer Care clinic (both in San Antonio, TX) between 1987 and 2011. In this group, 58.5% of the women were obese and 25.8% were overweight. Around 81% took aspirin and the rest took another nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). About 42% of the women took statins and 25% took omega-3 fatty acid. Even after controlling for statins and omega-3 fatty acid use, the results demonstrated a protective effect from aspirins and other NSAIDs. The researchers found that women with a body mass index greater than 30 who had ERα-positive breast cancer had a 52% lower rate of recurrence and a 28-month delay in recurrence if they were taking aspirin or other NSAIDs.

Find out more here: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/281386.php

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Metabolic syndrome connected to DDT exposure in womb

Metabolic syndrome connected to DDT exposure in womb

Exposure of pregnant mice to the pesticide DDT is linked to an increased risk of obesity, diabetes, high cholesterol and related conditions in female offspring later in life, according to a study led by the University of California, Davis. The study, published online in the journal PLOS ONE, is the first to show that developmental exposure to DDT increases the risk of females later developing metabolic syndrome – a cluster of conditions that include increased body fat, blood glucose, and cholesterol. DDT was banned in the United States in the 1970s but continues to be used for malaria control in countries including India and South Africa. Scientists gave mice doses of DDT comparable to exposures of people living in malaria-infested regions where it is regularly sprayed, as well as of pregnant mothers of U.S. adults who are now in their 50s.

Read more here: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/280392.php

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Depression Uncovered

Is Depression a Disease—or a Symptom of Inflammation?

The idea that depression and other mental health conditions are caused by an imbalance of chemicals (particularly serotonin and norepinephrine) in the brain is so deeply ingrained in our collective psyche that it seems almost sacrilegious to question it.  Of course Big Pharma has played a role in perpetuating this idea. Antidepressant drugs, which are based on the chemical imbalance theory, represent a $10 billion dollar market in the U.S. alone. According to the CDC, 11 percent of Americans over 12 years old take antidepressants, and they are the second-most prescribed medications (after cholesterol-lowering drugs). Doctors wrote a staggering 254 million prescriptions for antidepressants in 2010. What if depression isn’t caused by a “chemical imbalance” after all? More specifically, what if depression itself is not a disease, but a symptom of an underlying problem?

Learn more info here: http://chriskresser.com/is-depression-a-disease-or-a-symptom-of-inflammation

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