Eating Organic Makes a Difference!

collage fruits

In a recent article, The better-than-nothing diet, from New Hope Natural Media discusses how eating organic, even if it is only part time reduces your exposure to pesticides. Eating organic can lower organophosphate pesticides in your body even if you aren’t eating a full time organic diet.

Asthma

We are seeing a continuing increase in childhood diseases related to organophosphate exposure. A recent study in Environmental health Perspectives found that exposure to organophosphate pesticides in infants was associated with an increase respiratory symptoms and possible asthma.

Cognitive Deficits

Prenatal Exposure to Organophosphates, Paraoxonase 1, and Cognitive Development in Childhood from the Environmental Health Prospectives journal discusses how exposure prenatally to organophosphates can lead to deficits in cognitive development in babies. The organophosphates also adversely affect perceptual reasoning. These deficits begin at 12 months and continue all the way into early childhood.

Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)

An evaluation of The Charge Study found that living close to organophosphate pesticide application (less than 1.5 km) is associated with a 60% increase in autism and an increase in developmental delays.

Safer in the Big City?

One might think living in a large city away from agriculture might keep you safe from exposure. However, the study Population-Based Biomonitoring of Exposure to Organophosphate and Pyrethroid Pesticides in New York City found adults in New York City have higher pesticide levels than most of the rest of the United States.

Those eating green vegetables had higher levels of pesticides than those who largely abstained. This is why eating organic makes sense to lower our exposure.

In Conclusion

Non-organic apples, celery, grapes, peaches, and strawberries have some of the highest levels of pesticides. Look at The Environmental Group’s shopping guide to help choose fruits and vegetables with low levels of pesticides. Make sure you buy organic when possible, being mindful of the dirtiest fruits and vegetables from the guide.

Look to control household pests naturally whenever possible to keep exposure down for you and your family. There are many natural alternatives around the house, in the garden and the yard.

Check our WebVitamins selection of healthy, natural and organic foods.

 

In Good Health,

 

John Montague DC

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Thanksgiving Holiday Tips to Eat Healthy

thanksgiving

Most everyone feels guilty after a Thanksgiving holiday meal. With a little planning your meal can be healthy and happy.

  1. Eat a small protein snack before going. With meals starting often times in mid-afternoon people are hungry. Make sure to eat something at your regular meal times so you aren’t starving when your meal arrives.
  2. Fill up half your plate with green vegetables. This will help to fill you up and keep your intake of fatty food to a minimum.
  3. Turkey is lower in calories so fill up on turkey.
  4. Watch the gravy, gravy is high in fat. Use gravy sparingly.
  5. Eat slowly. To eat slowly you need to make sure you aren’t hungry, going back to rule number 1.
  6. One bad meal doesn’t spoil everything. One Thanksgiving meal is on average 3000 calories. This is the equivalent of less than one pound. Many people say in their head they they’ve blown their diet and keep eating poorly, and as a result they gain all the holiday pounds because they feel they have failed. Don’t let guilt keep you from eating well.

 

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Lasting Health Benefits of Mediterranean Diet

Mediterranean diets have lasting health benefits

The health benefits of switching to a Mediterranean style diet and upping the amount of time spent exercising for a period of just eight weeks can still be seen a year after stopping the regime, a new study has shown. The research by Sheffield Hallam University and the University of Lincoln in the UK revealed that the diet and exercise combination leads to improved blood flow in cells in the inner lining of the blood vessels – called the endothelial cells – a full 12 months after completing participation in the intervention programme. Endothelial cells line the interior of the entire vascular system of the human body – from the large arteries to the smallest capillaries – and improvements in their function could reduce the risk of people developing cardiovascular disease, the study said.

Find out more here: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/285063.php

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Lasting Health Benefits of Mediterranean Diet

Mediterranean diets have lasting health benefits

The health benefits of switching to a Mediterranean style diet and upping the amount of time spent exercising for a period of just eight weeks can still be seen a year after stopping the regime, a new study has shown. The research by Sheffield Hallam University and the University of Lincoln in the UK revealed that the diet and exercise combination leads to improved blood flow in cells in the inner lining of the blood vessels – called the endothelial cells – a full 12 months after completing participation in the intervention programme. Endothelial cells line the interior of the entire vascular system of the human body – from the large arteries to the smallest capillaries – and improvements in their function could reduce the risk of people developing cardiovascular disease, the study said.

Find out more here: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/285063.php

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The Health Benefits of Swiss Chard

What are the health benefits of Swiss chard?

If you have not been experimenting with Swiss chard in the kitchen, now is the time to start. Like it’s wildly popular green cousin kale, Swiss chard packs a powerful nutritional punch, providing over 700% of your daily needs for vitamin K and over 200% of daily vitamin A needs in just one cup. Swiss chard is also commonly known as silverbeet, spinach beet, perpetual spinach, crab beet and mangold. Along with other leafy greens and descendants of the beet family, Swiss chard contains high levels nitrates, which been shown to lower blood pressure, reduce the amount of oxygen needed during exercise and enhance athletic performance. This MNT Knowledge Center feature is part of a collection of articles on the health benefits of popular foods. It provides a nutritional breakdown of Swiss chard and an in-depth look at its possible health benefits, how to incorporate more Swiss chard into your diet and any potential health risks of consuming Swiss chard.

Find out more here: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/284103.php

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New Hope for Natural Weight Loss

A potential treatment for obesity: pterostilbene, a molecule similar to resveratrol

Nothing drives sales like the promise of a new supplement to help lose weight. I have always said that the best way to lose weight is to eat right and exercise. However, some people still struggle with weight loss.

This article in Medical News Today, discusses research from Spain that shows pterostilbene reduces body fat. Now for the bad news the research was on rats. Which is good news if you have some fat rats at home you want to treat. It does not mean that pterostilbene will work as well for you.

Another question most people will ask is what is Pterostilbene? Pterostilbene is a phenol very similar to resveratrol. It is found in a wide variety of foods including wine, blueberries, peanuts, grapes and more.

This is promising research however, and once it talked about on Dr. Oz you can be guaranteed that it will all sell out overnight.

Source: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/284740.php

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The Health Benefits of Pumpkin

What are the health benefits of pumpkin?

If the only thing you have ever done with pumpkin is carve it and fill it with a candle, you are not alone. Many people tend to think of pumpkins as little more than just a holiday decoration or a pie filling, but you may want to rethink this plump orange plant. Pumpkin is an extremely nutrient dense food, meaning it is chock-full of vitamins and minerals but low on calories. There are many creative ways pumpkin can be incorporated into your diet, including desserts, soups, salads, preserves and even as a substitute for butter. Next time pumpkin season comes around, don’t carve it, cook it up and eat it! According to the USDA National Nutrient database, one cup of pumpkin, cooked, boiled, drained, without salt contains 49 calories, 1.76 grams of protein, 0.17 grams of fat, 0 grams of cholesterol and 12 grams of carbohydrate (including 2.7 grams of fiber and 5.1 grams of sugar).

Find out more here: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/279610.php

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The Health Benefits of Sweet Potatoes

What are the health benefits of sweet potatoes?

Sweet potatoes pack a powerful nutritional punch. They have got over 400% of your daily needs for vitamin A in one medium spud, as well as loads of fiber and potassium. They have got more grams of natural sugars than regular potato but more overall nutrients with fewer calories. Despite the terms sweet potato and yam often being used interchangeably, they are actually not even botanically related. Yams are almost exclusively grown in Africa and are more dry and starchy compared to a sweet potato. So how did these two vegetables become so intertwined? There are two different varieties of sweet potatoes, firm and soft. When soft sweet potatoes were being cultivated in the Americas, African slaves began calling them yams because of their resemblance to their familiar native vegetable. The name caught on as a way to distinguish between the two types of sweet potatoes. Today, you are unlikely to find a true yam in the grocery store unless you are shopping in an international market.

Learn more info here: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/281438.php

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Is Gluten Bad for You?

Should You Dump Gluten? How Going Gluten Free Can Unlock Weight Loss, Energy & Longevity

Besides being fast-food chains, they’re among many large companies that have rolled out gluten-free food options in the last few years. You’re probably used to seeing the “special diet” section in Whole Foods, or even your local chain grocery store, but when corporate giants start paying attention to specific dietary trends, you can bet they are more than just a passing fad. It seems that gluten-free products are everywhere these days, and like many of your health-conscious, smoothie-sipping, label-reading friends, you may be wondering if a gluten-free diet is right for you. And in a culture where pastries, pizza, and pasta dominate the standard diet, you might also want to know why wheat is suddenly getting such a bad rap.

Read more here: http://www.alternativemedicine.com/celiac-disease/should-you-dump-gluten-how-going-gluten-free-can-unlock-weight-loss-energy-longevity

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An Apple a Day Against Obesity?

Could an apple a day protect against obesity?

The research team, led by Giuliana Noratto of the School of Food Science at Washington State, publish their findings in the journal Food Chemistry. Apples have many health benefits, according to previous research. Last year, Medical News Today reported on a study suggesting that eating an apple a day may be just as beneficial as daily statin use for preventing vascular mortality. A 2011 study also claimed that apples and pears may reduce the risk of stroke by more than 50%. But according to the team involved in this latest research, very few studies have looked at how the bioactive compounds in apples that are not absorbed during digestion – such as polyphenols (a type of antioxidant) and dietary fiber – affect the friendly gut bacteria that boost immunity and aid weight maintenance.

Read more info here: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/283223.php

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