The Health Benefits of Chickpeas

What are the health benefits of chickpeas?

Originally cultivated in the Mediterranean and the Middle East, chickpeas, also known as garbanzo beans, have spread their culinary influence to areas all over the world. They are featured prominently in Italian, Greek, Indian, Middle Eastern, Spanish and Portuguese cuisine. Though the most common type of chickpea appears round and beige, other varieties include colors such as black, green, and red. Like other legumes such as beans, peas and lentils, chickpeas are prized for their high protein and fiber content, and also contain several key vitamins and minerals known to benefit human health. This MNT Knowledge Center feature is part of a collection of articles on the health benefits of popular foods. It provides a nutritional breakdown of the chickpea and an in-depth look at its possible health benefits, how to incorporate more chickpeas into your diet and any potential health risks of consuming chickpea.

Find out more here: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/280244.php

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Probiotics Consumption Helps Diminish Fat Accumulation

Consuming probiotics for a month helps diminish fat accumulation in the liver, according to a new study

Gut-bacteria-1000x1000

Spanish scientists have demonstrated through an experiment on obese rats that the consumption of probiotics during thirty days helps diminish the accumulation of fat in the liver. This new finding, published by the journal PLOS ONE, is a great step forward on the fight against the Non-Alcolohic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD), which is closely related to obesity and diabetes. Researchers from the ‘Nutrition Biochemistry: Theurapetic Applications’ group (CTS-461) and the José Mataix Institute for Nutrition and Food Technology at the University of Granada have demonstrated that the administration of three probiotic strains diminishes the accumulation of fat in the liver of obese rats.

Learn more info here: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/279854.php

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The Mediterranean Diet and Its Effects on Cognitive Decline

The Mediterranean diet has varied effects on cognitive decline among different races

While the Mediterranean diet may have broad health benefits, its impact on cognitive decline differs among race-specific populations, according to a new study published in the Journal of Gerontology. The team of researchers, including Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU Prof. Danit R. Shahar RD, Ph.D, analyzed an NIH/NIA prospective cohort study [Health ABC] conducted over eight years in the U.S. to measure the effects of adherence to a Mediterranean diet. Prof. Shahar is affiliated with the BGU S. Daniel Abraham International Center for Health and Nutrition, Department of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences. The Mediterranean-style diet (MedDiet) has fewer meat products and more plant-based foods and monounsaturated fatty acids from olive and canola oil (good) than a typical American diet.

Find out more here: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/279764.php

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The Mediterranean Diet and Its Effects on Cognitive Decline

The Mediterranean diet has varied effects on cognitive decline among different races

While the Mediterranean diet may have broad health benefits, its impact on cognitive decline differs among race-specific populations, according to a new study published in the Journal of Gerontology. The team of researchers, including Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU Prof. Danit R. Shahar RD, Ph.D, analyzed an NIH/NIA prospective cohort study [Health ABC] conducted over eight years in the U.S. to measure the effects of adherence to a Mediterranean diet. Prof. Shahar is affiliated with the BGU S. Daniel Abraham International Center for Health and Nutrition, Department of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences. The Mediterranean-style diet (MedDiet) has fewer meat products and more plant-based foods and monounsaturated fatty acids from olive and canola oil (good) than a typical American diet.

Find out more here: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/279764.php

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Stress and High-Fat Meals Can Slow Down Metabolism in Women

Weighty issue: Stress and high-fat meals combine to slow metabolism in women

Researchers questioned study participants about the previous day’s stressors before giving them a meal consisting of 930 calories and 60 grams of fat. The scientists then measured their metabolic rate — how long it took the women to burn calories and fat — and took measures of blood sugar, triglycerides, insulin and the stress hormone cortisol. On average, the women in the study who reported one or more stressors during the previous 24 hours burned 104 fewer calories than nonstressed women in the seven hours after eating the high-fat meal — a difference that could result in weight gain of almost 11 pounds in one year. The stressed women also had higher levels of insulin, which contributes to the storage of fat, and less fat oxidation — the conversion of large fat molecules into smaller molecules that can be used as fuel. Fat that is not burned is stored.

Find out more here: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/07/140714100128.htm

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The Best Weight Loss Supplements

Which weight loss supplements are best?

Dozens of supplement ingredients have been touted for weight loss, but which have the strongest evidence showing they work and, among those, which products are highest in quality? To answer these questions, ConsumerLab.com, the independent health and nutrition product evaluator, reviewed the clinical evidence for more than 20 ingredients and tested the quality of more than 50 products. ConsumerLab found that no supplement has a large weight-loss effect, but certain ingredients may have a modest, short-term effect equating to 1 to 3 pounds lost in a month. From a quality standpoint, however, more than one-third of products used for weight loss have failed to pass ConsumerLab.com’s testing, most often for containing less of an ingredient than claimed.

Read more here: http://newhope360.com/ingredients/which-weight-loss-supplements-are-best

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A Raw Warm Salad by Ani Phyo

A Warm Green Salad Recipe

I like the raw diet and I like Ani Phyo. In fact, her cookbook I think is my favorite raw cookbook. Tomatoes do much better with heat and I think that as they are cooked they are better for you.

When I am practicing the raw diet sometimes, I really want something warm. This is a great recipe to give you just that little bit of warmth

Source: http://www.aniphyo.com/warm-green-salad-recipe/

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L-arginine May Help With Belly Fat

L-arginine may help blast belly fat (apologies to Dr. Oz)

A new pilot study suggests the potential of the amino acid l-arginine to promote weight loss. Mayo Clinic scientists conducted the research, which was published in the Journal of Dietary Supplements and noted on foodconsumer.org. L-arginine is one of the 22 amino acids found in high-protein foods, particularly peanuts. It’s been used as a supplement ingredient to improve libido, sports performance, and for cardiovascular health, although there are some safety concerns. Its function has been shown to improve blood flow and dilation of blood vessels by increasing nitric oxide. The researchers found that l-arginine may be useful in treating central, or visceral obesity. Central obesity (also known as abdominal obesity, or belly fat) is linked to greater cardiometabolic risk than other types of obesity.

Read more info here: http://newhope360.com/breaking-news/l-arginine-may-help-blast-belly-fat-apologies-dr-oz

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The Effects of Almonds with Meals or as Snacks

Appetitive, dietary and health effects of almonds consumed with meals or as snacks: a randomized, controlled trial.

Snacks contribute toward a significant proportion of human total daily energy intake. This study investigated the effects of almonds, a satiating and nutrient-rich, common snack, on postprandial glycemia, appetite, short-term body weight and fasting blood parameters when consumed with meals or alone as a snack. Almonds lowered serum glucose responses postprandially. Effects were most prominent in the snack groups. Almonds, consumed as snacks, also reduced hunger and desire to eat during the acute-feeding session. After 4 weeks, anthropometric measurements and fasting blood biochemistries did not differ from the control group or across intervention groups. Without specific guidance, daily energy intake was reduced to compensate for energy from the provided almonds. Dietary monounsaturated fat and α-tocopherol intakes were significantly increased in all almond groups.

Read more info here: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24084509?dopt=Abstract

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The Sustainable Way to Lose Weight, Feel Better and Stay Healthy

Dr. Jonathan Goodman 

  Do you want to lose weight, feel in control of your health, and get off all the medications you are taking? Are you sick and tired of being sick and tired? Have you been running yourself ragged exercising, punishing yourself to find you’re getting nowhere except sore? There is a better, more sane and sustainable way to harness your body’s own fat burning machine. You don’t have to count every calorie or obsess about portion sizes.  You can eat real, delicious food and know that you’re making healthy food choices. Why not eat this way?  Let’s look at the solution.

Dr. Goodman’s Metabolically Optimized Eating Plan

First step:  Find out your metabolism:

machine   Each of us has a built-in metabolic rate that burns calories even while we’re doing nothing. This is called the resting metabolic rate, or RMR. A simple 10-minute test done in my office will reveal your rate and establish a baseline.

Second step: Find out your body fat level.

The goal is to lose fat, not so much weight, although both will happen. The more fat you lose while retaining or adding muscle, the more metabolically active you’ll be. We’ll use a simple machine to measure the percentage of your weight which is body fat.

Third step:  Lab testing.

We will determine some important values which show how your body handles hunger signals and how sensitive to sugar you are.  We will investigate overall heart health and whether you are on the way to being diabetic or handing sugar ok.  We will test for food sensitivities or intolerances if you have a lot of digestive issues.  These can make it very hard to follow an eating plan that makes us bloated and tired!

After gathering this information, we will sit down and design a metabolically optimized eating and exercise plan just for you!

So, what will I be eating?  If any specific foods show up as problem foods on testing, they will be excluded. Lots of meat, chicken and fish Nuts and seeds Vegetables – that doesn’t include starches! Fruit Grains and sugar are not allowed on the plan as they get in the way of your metabolism.  In order to harness your body’s fat burning potential, you need to cut the carbs you are taking in.  You’ll still get carbs from the fruit, veggies, nuts and seeds you eat, but these are loaded with vitamins and minerals and don’t slow your metabolism down.

What’s Next?

In the beginning we’ll meet either twice or each week for the first month to make sure you are comfortable in your new eating plan.  Most people have lots of questions and need to tweak the ratios of foods they eat to get comfortable.  After a month to six weeks, your body should be adjusted to this new way of eating.  You will be truly amazed to see the pounds coming off regardless of how much you eat. After three months we will retest your metabolism.  Given your weight loss and changes in diet, your metabolism should be slightly lower.  You can help yourself by building lean muscle. That’s where the exercise plan comes in.  Exercise is not the major way you will  be losing weight, but staying active is great for your mood and overall well-being.  We’ll go over specific exercises in the beginning to suit your temperament and capabilities. Depending on how much of your goal weight you’ve lost and where your metabolism is, we may adjust your eating plan.  We may also retest your values to see how they’ve changed and how much healthier you are!

 

Dr. Goodman can be seen in his office in either Bristol or Bloomfield, CT. To see Dr. Goodman click here.

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